Working Together in Nipmuc Country in 2011

Before I start this post, let me say straight out. There is no nefarious plot to combine the bands, change the spelling of Nipmuc Nation, or overthrow the current administration. OK?

That being said, we accomplished alot in the working together column.

  • In April, the Natick Nipmuc Band presented at the Nipmuc Nation tribal office “‎2010 Deer Island Memorial Sacred Run & Paddle: Nipmuc Perspectives on the Sacred Journey.”
  • The Second Annual Joint Strawberry Moon between Nipmuc Nation and Chaubunagungamaug Band of Nipmuck Indians was held at the Nipmuc Nation Tribal Office in June.
  • Chaubunagungamaug Band members assisted during the 58th Hassanamisco Indian Fair in July on the Reservation.
  • Members of the Natick Nipmuc Band and the Chaubunagungamaug Band as well as many other Nipmuks were in attendance at the Fair.
  • The first Nipmuk meeting was held in August at Westville Lake in Sturbridge. The Nipmuk meetings are intended to promote cooperation between band members and those Nipmuks not enrolled in a band in the hope of building our futures together.
  • Members of the Nipmuc Nation assisted at the Chaubunagungamaug Band’s September Pau Wau at Holland Pond.
  • The September Pau Wau was well attended by Natick Nipmucs, Hassanamiscos and other Nipmuks. Honestly, one of the best pau waus I’ve ever attended.
  • Natick Nipmuc Youth leader actively led Hassanamisco youth on paddles, to conferences, summer camp and other activities.
  • The three Nipmuk bands joined forces on a state-government issue.
  • Natick Nipmucs and Hassanamisco Nipmucs jointly attended the first Youth Paddle at Lake Quiusigamond.
  • Nipmuks from everywhere attended or assisted at the Natick Nipmuc 2011 Deer Island Memorial.
  • The first (in many years) Nipmuc Spiritual Gathering was held on the reservation over two days in November. Nipmuks from everywhere actively participated.
  • Members of Natick Nipmuc and Nipmuc Nation jointly presented Nipmuk history in Littleton, MA.
  • All Nipmuks freely attended the various socials hosted by Hassanamisco and Chaubunagungamaug including Strawberry Moon, Nikkomo, and Harvest Moon.

So this is a beginning.

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Not Quite the New Year

At 12:00 am this morning, my grandsons and I blew into our noise-makers and jumped up and down. We had a party in my living room to welcome the year 2012. I rushed them outside to try and catch the firework display with our binoculars and telescopes but there didn’t seem to be one. We came back in, ate some more, drank some more, called and sent text messages to our loved ones. They finally settled down just before 2 am and to sleep we all went.

And so goes our calendar New Year celebration every year. But for us, the real beginning of the year comes when the seasons shift, the air warms, and green begins to return to our yard.

New Year in Nipmuc Country begins with Spring planting time. The exact date varies from year to year. The Nipmuc Nation will celebrate the New Year at our Planting Moon celebration on Saturday, May 5th at Hassanamesit. Won’t you join us?

Celebrate Columbus? Nah! Let’s Celebrate “Indigenous Survival Day”!

Ok so every second Monday in October the same thing occurs. Columbus Day. Named for that intrepid sailor who refused to believe that the Americas were not Asia until his THIRD trip here. Every year there are parades and every year Native people and others (btw, “Thanks, Others!”) protest the celebration of a man who dedicated years of his life to the exploitation, torture and murder of the inhabitants of the islands just south of our border.

It should truly be named “Italian-American Day” because it was the Italian Knights of Columbus that got FDR in 1937 to make the day official. And I think that would have been swell. I’d gladly parade through the streets with the promise of pasta at the end to celebrate my fellow Americans. It’s probably too late for that though.

I can’t celebrate Columbus. Honestly, he was lost, he was greedy, he was deadly and he was afraid of Ferdinand and Isabella. Plus he didn’t actually discover America – we already lived here! He wasn’t even the first European to hang out on our coasts (remember the Vikings?). The only thing good that I can say about that entire episode is “Thank the Creator he didn’t land in Plymouth.”

“Indigenous Survival Day”. That just sorta rolls off the tongue, doesn’t it? And a holiday like that would recognize the enduring strength of the Americas’ First Peoples. After all, we survived Columbus, the Puritans, Andrew Jackson, Vikings, smallpox-infected blankets, Manifest Destiny, allotments, the reservation system, and the Wild, Wild West.

We Are Still Here! Let’s celebrate that!

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Unnai is the Nipmuc word for Truth.

Truth is what I hope you all will find in this blog (except when I’m writing fiction, of course).

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