Hattie McKinley Anderson and family

Some photographic images recently surfaced of African-Americans living in Worcester, MA in 1900. Two of those photos are labelled ‘Kenneth Anderson’ and ‘Mrs. Anderson and baby’. Kenneth was my great-grandmother Hattie’s younger brother and Mrs. Anderson was Hattie’s mom. Here’s a quick genealogical sketch of my great-grandmother, Harriet McKinley Anderson Bostic. Hattie Bostic with a neighbor child and two grandsons. Hattie McKinley Anderson was born … Continue reading Hattie McKinley Anderson and family

Mary Jane (Scott) Smith and James Martin Smith

Mary Jane (Scott) Smith and her son, James Martin Smith.  William Bullard, Mary Jane and James Martin Smith, about 1900, courtesy of Frank Morrill and Clark University.   Mary Jane Scott was born on 13 Nov 1862 in West Boylston to Edward W. Scott and Catherine Annie Jackson. Edward and Catherine were former slaves who traveled from their birthplace in Warrenton, VA to Massachusetts with … Continue reading Mary Jane (Scott) Smith and James Martin Smith

Sarah (Scott) Shepard

Florence Shepard, Sarah Scott Shepard, and Eugene Shepard, Jr. circa 1900 in Worcester, MA William Bullard, Mrs. Shepard and Two Children, about 1900, courtesy of Frank Morrill, the Worcester Art Museum, and Clark University. Sarah Ann Scott is my 3rd great-aunt. She was the daughter of Edward Scott and Catherine Annie Jackson of Warrenton, VA. You can read more about Sarah’s parents and her younger brother, … Continue reading Sarah (Scott) Shepard

Ardelle Barbadoes Roberson

Eileen and Ardelle Wanso (later Roberson). circa 1901 in Worcester, MA William Bullard, Mrs. Ardel C. Wanso and her daughter Eileen, courtesy of Frank Morrill, the Worcester Art Museum, and Clark University. Ardelle was born on 30 April 1868 in Boston, MA. She married William Gloster Wanso (1872-1905) on 23 December 1897 in Worcester, MA. The couple had one child, Eileen Wanso (also recorded as Arlene … Continue reading Ardelle Barbadoes Roberson

The Family Scott

The above picture is a plaque that now hangs in the second floor of City Hall in Worcester, Massachusetts. The ceremony yesterday was charming and long overdue. As it states on the plaque, Charles E. Scott served as a City Councilor from 1918 to his death on 11 October 1938. Elected not by the tiny people of color population but instead by white, mostly European … Continue reading The Family Scott

Gilbert Walker

Gilbert Walker was born into slavery in Maryland around 1817. He escaped and made his way to freedom in Worcester, MA. By 1850, he was living and working in the city. He was a barber and had his own shop on Main Street. While on his way to Massachusetts, Gilbert’s daughter Sarah E. Walker was born in New York. In Massachusetts, he married a Nipmuc … Continue reading Gilbert Walker

Abraham Toney

Abraham Toney was the eldest son of Margaret (Peggy) Romsor and Caesar Toney. He was born in February of 1762 on his parent’s farm in Upton, MA. He married Mary Harry from the Narragansett tribe on 12 Oct 1787. Only 4 years later, he married Hannah Chase in Upton. Abraham had at least two children – Susan and Alfred. Abraham’s father died between 1790 and … Continue reading Abraham Toney

Frank Scott

Frank Scott was my great-grandmother Nellie’s brother. He died years before I was born so I never knew him. While researching Grama Nellie, I found her brothers – the middle brother was Frank. I don’t remember her ever speaking of her brothers. I asked my older relatives and they weren’t sure either. I tend to ask the same questions repeatedly so eventually one of my … Continue reading Frank Scott

Annie Kent & Rachel Steemer

Annie Kent was born about 1822 in Maryland, perhaps into slavery. Her given name was Nancy after her mother and her father was Samuel Kent. While living free in London Grove, Chester, Pennsylvania, she married Peter Bostic, a free Black man. The couple had at least two children, William born in 1838 and Mary born in 1842. By 1849, Annie was widowed and remarried to … Continue reading Annie Kent & Rachel Steemer

28 Days of Black History in Worcester, MA

Today is the start of Black History Month. For each of the next 27 days, I will post a short article about Black history in my home town of Worcester, MA. Why? Because our ancestors are often forgotten or unknown and yet, they made a difference in all of our lives and in this city. See You Soon!   Continue reading 28 Days of Black History in Worcester, MA